Spay & Neuter

Spay (Ovariohysterectomy)

 

Purpose of Procedure

Elective sterilization is done primarily to prevent heat cycles and unwanted pregnancies and offspring. This goal is accomplished by removing ovaries and uterus.

Sterilization also prevents or dramatically reduces the incidence of mammary (breast) tumors:

• If sterilization is done before 6 months of age, the risk of mammary gland tumors is almost completely eliminated.

• Some decrease in tumor development still occurs if the surgery

is done before the fourth estrus or 2½ years of age.

• Ovariohysterectomy is the treatment of choice for uterine diseases such as pyometra (uterine infection), metritis, cystic changes and tumors involving the uterus. Vaginal prolapse, uterine prolapse, and some hormonal problems, such as diabetes mellitus, may benefit from a sterilization procedure

 

Description of Technique

Ovariohysterectomy is removal of both the uterus and ovaries and is commonly referred to as a spay operation.

An appropriate preoperative evaluation that includes a physical examination and blood tests is usually recommended, even for elective procedures. Comprehensive laboratory tests are advisable in older dogs to detect any problems that may present a risk for anesthesia and surgery. Other preoperative testing depends on the presence of underlying diseases.

 

Preparation of Animal

Your veterinarian will instruct you to withhold food and sometimes water for a certain period of time, depending on the anesthesia to be used for the surgery.

 

Potential Complications

Most dogs do well after surgery, with no or minimal complications.

• Minor complications include licking at the incision, inflammation or formation of a small pocket of fluid (seroma) or blood (hematoma) beneath the skin at the incision, and premature loss of external skin sutures.

• Hemorrhage after surgery is more common in large, obese dogs and in dogs that are in heat. Bleeding is also more likely in older bitches that have underlying blood clotting disorders and in some breeds with a higher incidence of inherited clotting disorders, such as von Willebrand disease in the Doberman pinscher.

• As is possible with all abdominal incisions, a breakdown of the abdominal wall with herniation of abdominal contents can occur rarely.

• If the ovaries and the uterus were both removed, the small portion of the uterus left behind may become infected at a later date. This complication is referred to as stump pyometra, and it is sometimes associated with incomplete removal of ovarian tissue at the time of the original sterilization procedure.

 

Postoperative/Follow-up Care

In many instances, the sterilization procedure is uncomplicated and the patient may be discharged from the veterinary hospital on the same day, often with appropriate pain management. When an OVH is performed in patients at risk for bleeding or with serious underlying uterine disease, continued hospitalization may be recommended so the animal can be monitored and appropriate therapy delivered.

The dog should be kept quiet for 10-14 days or longer, according

to your veterinarian’s instructions. Limiting the animal’s activity (no running, stair-climbing, or jumping) helps minimize the chance of breakdown of the abdominal incision. If possible, the dog should be kept inside in a clean, dry environment until the incision has healed.

No recheck visits may be needed if external sutures were not used. In other cases, recheck visits are scheduled based on the reason for the sterilization procedure. Notify your veterinarian if any bleeding or persistent oozing occurs at the incision, if the dog continues to lick or traumatize the incision, if any swelling develops under the incision, or if the incision starts to open.

 

 

Neuter (Castration)

 

Purpose of Procedure

Castration is performed to

• Reduce overpopulation and unwanted puppy and kitten

• Decrease male aggressiveness and roaming behavior

• Decrease the incidence of undesirable urination behaviors

• Reduce diseases of the prostate and possible tumors of the perianal area

• Help prevent the occurrence of perineal hernias in the older male or recurrence of a hernia following surgical hernia repair

• Prevent, eliminate, or remove tumors involving the testes or scrotum

 

Preparation of Animal

Your veterinarian will instruct you to withhold food and sometimes water for a certain period of time, depending on the anesthesia to be used for the surgery. Most patients undergoing an elective castration are healthy and require minimal laboratory testing. If castration is done as part of therapy for another disease, more involved diagnostic tests may be done prior to castration.

 

Potential Complications

Most dogs do well after surgery, with no or minimal complications.

• Excessive licking requires some type of restraint device, such as an Elizabethan collar, to prevent trauma to the incision.

• A small amount of bloody fluid may collect within the remaining scrotal sac and usually disappears within 2 weeks.

• Not all dogs and cats castrated for roaming or behavioral problems show significant improvement after castration.

 

Postoperative Follow-up Care

The dog should be kept quiet for 10-14 days or until the sutures are removed, especially if an abdominal surgery was done.

Restrict play and exercise to leash walking. If possible, except for going outside for elimination purposes, the dog should be kept inside in a clean and dry environment until the incisions have healed. No recheck visits may be needed if external sutures were not used.

 

 

SERVICES

- Vaccinations
- Surgical procedures
- Dental

- Acupuncture

- Traditional Chinese Veterinary      Medicine consultation

 

OPENING HOURS

09:00 AM - 07:00 PM

Monday - Friday

 

09:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Saturday, Sunday

Closed for Holidays

 

ADDRESS

104-1125 Nicola Ave. Port Coquitlam V3B 8B2

 

burkeviewpet@gmail.com 
Tel:  604-475-5134

  

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